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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
party is willing to say we'll bring religion -- organized prayer back to public school. we'll outlaw abortion. we won't go along with this new trend towards gay rights. we're with you in the church. how do you tell those people the reason you joined the republican party they don't want to push too hard anymore, in fact, they want to sort of closet it? >> you can't really tell them that so they are not exactly saying that. you've got a spectacle where reince priebus is saying, yes, we want gay people to vote for us but we won't change your policies. we won't give them equal rights. we've seen him backtrack now on gay marriage and, you know, we want african-americans to vote for us but we're going to suppress their votes in lots of states. so it's totally contradictory. they recognize they have a branding problem and messaging problem and, chris, the voters you're talking about have gotten old and some of them have passed away and left us. and the issue -- >> joan, you have just -- you have just basically said that your party is dying. >> well, first of all -- >> it is dying. >> you pr
, as an expert in both religion and the media right now, this is a tremendous media event. this is a tremendous introduction to the world now that's really been going on for days. >> i thought about this. the media coverage has been wonderful but i don't think the media is doing it for the church but for the people. i think your ratings have been very high because religion matters to people. with statistics thrown around, more people go to mass on sunday than go to professional sports events, but i think as the networks that are responding now to the great interest in religion among the people and certainly in the united states and probably elsewhere. >> one of the things we've been told throughout the morning is ben wedeman was telling us earlier, that the crowd's not as huge as they were perhaps last week. it is tuesday, after all, and people do have to work. one of the advantages of this is that so many people in the crowd, they're getting a really close look at pope francis when he toured around in the square in the open air pope mobile and greeted the people of rome which is a personal vie
, the year of the lord's favor. that means in the time of ancient israel where you're state and religion are the same. it's a government program. you forgive debt. you release your slaves, and you redistribute your land. it's not an option. it's not individual charity. the people in the synagogue actually realize that jesus means for them to do that now not just, you know, in the nice scroll from isaiah that he just read. they run him from the synagogue up the hill and try to throw him off. which means that they were a little irritated by jesus' anuns education that we have to do this now. people are always telling me, oh no, it's not a government program. well, it's a government program. jesus annunciation of the jubilee is debt forgiveness for everything. >> john: you're exactly right. when i try to talk about this myself i'm to do it by my conservative christian friends jesus said the private individual should help the poor. the government shouldn't pick my pockets to help the poor. jesus didn't have democracy. we do. if jesus chose to vote to help the poor instead of bombing iraq, is
he said. "the vast majority of the world's 1.4 billion muslims adhere to a view of their religion that agrees on the need to impose sharia or islamic law on the world." he goes on to say that both the obama and even bush administration were too soft on islamists. does it disturb you that that comes from the mouth of once the top enforcement officer of this nation? >> well, yes, and it speaks to, you know, sort of the problem we're saying this report does not really get into policy. there's a reason they don't get into policy. if you get into policy, this is the sort of thing you have to say. >> how can he possibly make a claim like this about such a vast number of people? >> the entire tone from the right since 9/11 toward islam, toward muslims has been on par with this, roughly speaking. that's because it's sort of -- there was an appetite for that among the conservative base. and there's so much pressure in the party right now. it's a dysfunctional party in so many ways because there is so much pressure to conform to, you know, where the base is on a question like this. and if y
contextually means taking care of children. but this -- this is a sign, their religion is so often about signs and sim bog that he was able to have his inaugural mass on this day, that we have a ten-year anniversary of the iraq war coming out, that we have the anniversary of the march from selma to montgomery coming out, that these are opportunities that his leadership has begun during for him to weigh in and hear what his message is as it extends to the world. >> and let's recall during that homily the protection of creation that he talked about. this is one who took francis as his name, francis being a great creationist, praying brother, son, sister moon, and so this pope, i think, you will see a reach out, an outreach to ecology and protecting of the environment, much like benedict. >> looking at all the flags waving a moment ago in st. peter's square there. it is quite a scene. the vatican says 200,000 people, 150,000 to 200,000 people there. maybe a little bit on the lower end if you're doing crowd estimates right there. but jim bittermann is there and whatever the number is, there was ce
with religion and so that's where we have the fundamental disagreement. >> which may be part of the problem. i think everybody should be able to be married civilly perhaps, but only some then have a religious ceremony. >> we'll take that. that's all we want. >> religious has a connotation. that's the distinction. >> if the catholic church says they support full civil rights, equal rights for same-sex partners, but they don't want it called marriage in the church, we'd take it. that would be fantastic. >> does it seem like that is exactly what he was doing? >> he hasn't said that publicly. perhaps said it privately. >> in the bishops conference meeting, he said it. >> it's a different prism that they are doing everything through. the prism through the archbishop of buenos aires is different than pope. >> and smaller group of people than the 1.2 billion throughout the world. >> i think we ultimately believe in separation of church and state and equal rights. i don't want a religious leader denying rights to people. >> i don't want to suggest that somehow i'm negative on it. if the new pope is wi
accomplished in india. we studied the role of disobedience and we studied the great religions of the world. and when it was time for the young people to sit in, we did. many of us use nonviolence not simply as a technique or but it as a way of life in the way of living. we wanted as dr. king was there the soul of america to create a beloved community. you heard in the introduction i did get arrested a few times. 40 times. during the 60s but since i've been in congress i got arrested four more times around the issues of south africa and around what was going on in sudan. but we never gave up during those days. we never gave in. them. we never gave out in spite of being beaten, left bloody and unconscious, having a concussion on that ridge. i still believe in the power of love. i still believe that somehow and some way we can overcome. we can create one community, one family, one house if we all live in the same house. not just an american house but the world house. it doesn't matter we are there we are lack, white latino asian-america or native american we must stay with our house and hold
. to stand with us on freedom of speech and freedom of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad
at revelation mother earth and all these things there's a lot of religion in ozzie's songs and it's did he ever she will and positive. it is. especially in this reward, this is satan's laughing and spreading wicks. the line is talking about when guys like rumsfeld, when these guys die that's who's there to welcome them for what they've done. this is a great song, absolutely. that's what i want to get to today. last night, 10 years ago when we all went to bed there were thousands of munitions being fired at a city of civilians. they were run by an evil dictator we were told who must be stopped because national security and the security of the world and at a this guy, he has weapons of mass destruction we know where they are all these kind of things. i want to know from you what your favorite iraq war lie was and who was the person who brought it to you, because there were some good object old-fashioned bush ones, the mushroom cloud. we do not want your mushroom soup to become a mushroom cloud. in a matter of hours technology that takes years to actually get to that they're not actually pursuing
the world's religions have to that tiny swath of land, and a symbolically rich way for a christian u.s. president to wrap up a trip that has focused on sealing bonds with the jewish state. a trip that the white house and american and israeli officials at this point seem quite pleased with. >> you are in amman, jordan, where the president will be meeting with jordan's king abdullah. he's a very close ally of the u.s. but he is under a tremendous amount of pressure, both internally and externally. so what's on the agenda for the meetings there? >> well, the president lands here in three hours. he's going to have a meeting with king abdullah then speak briefly to the press. only one question on each side and then the two men will have a dinner. as you point out, jordan is a close u.s. ally. the country has a peace treaty with israel. and it's also home to close to 2 million palestinians. so, it would be an important player in any peace negotiations. so that would come up and be up for discussion. but there are other more immediate issues for them right now. syria, jordan has taken in mo
paul. and i am an old time lutheran. is not to be trusted. it is important to know exactly the religion of our candidates. there is nothing more important. host: she is gone. father is apaul's christian and religious man. the republican party is going through rebuilding and redesign and try to figure out what they will do and rand paul could be a big part of that. he had a filibuster on the floor and i'm sure we will be hearing his name more in the future. host: mechanicsville, va., go ahead. caller: i have a question -- when you are debating about the budget, why do they continue to put amendments in there that have absolutely nothing to do with - the budget. ? guest: that the great question. it's because they can. there is a role in the senate that says they can attach strings to the budget and no one can stop them. that the opportunity senators have, they took it. mideast policy got involved and to guns and so they did whatever they wanted to do. that was on full display. not covered in the lessons proffered by "school house rock." you talked about briefly but you can expand about ho
of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connecti
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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